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Chicago, IL
USA

Cities of Peace seeks to amplify the struggles of young people in Chicago and Phnom Penh as they organize to transform harm and create community healing. Using their own site-specific histories as a jumping off point, the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Peace Institute of Cambodia will form Community Peace Councils which will interrogate the roots of structural and relational violence and practice transformative justice. They will produce a documentary film, develop exhibitions, and participate in an international exchange which will culminate in a Community Peacebuilding Summit in Chicago in the summer of 2015.

Blog

Questions and reflections, transformations, and manifestations by and for Cities of Peace. 

 

A Journey into the History of Cambodia

Maria De La Paz

Cities of Peace fellows spent time last week visiting the Cambodian Association of Illinois learning about the history of Cambodia and the horrific details of the Khmer Rouge. Read below for quotes from the peace fellows on their experience at the Cambodian Association and progress in Cities of Peace so far. 


Brianna:

"During the visit at the Cambodian Museum, I felt connected to the pain and suffering of the people who died or gotten physically, emotionally, and mentally abused during the massive genocide in Phnom Phenn. It made me realize the significance of valuing others lives as if it was your own because we are all humans and the day we start to treat each other like beast, humanity is thrown out the window. Also, learning about how the United States played a drastic role towards the deaths of the Cambodians made me feel so low due to the fact that I have no control over being a US Citizen. If they look at Americans with disgust, I totally wouldn't blame them for a second. However, my goal is to create peace and harmony throughout the world. The truth of the matter is, we are all we got! So, coming together in solidarity and building healthy relationships amongst each other will finally lead towards the cease of trauma, structural, and interpersonal violence that happen on the daily."

Moses:

"What makes someone kill millions of one's own countrymen? Although the Cambodian Genocide was an isolated event with it's unique history and circumstances: the story was far too common.I thought about how we're currently seeing this story play out again in the Middle East with the Islamic State. A region destabilized by war has a power vacuum that was, in part, created by ill conceived American foreign policy with disastrous repercussions."

PAMELA:

"During the visit at the Cambodian Museum, I felt connected to the pain and suffering of the people who died or gotten physically, emotionally, and mentally abused during the massive genocide in Phnom Phenn. It made me realize the significance of valuing others lives as if it was your own because we are all humans and the day we start to treat each other like beast, humanity is thrown out the window. Also, learning about how the United States played a drastic role towards the deaths of the Cambodians made me feel so low due to the fact that I have no control over being a US Citizen. If they look at Americans with disgust, I totally wouldn't blame them for a second. However, my goal is to create peace and harmony throughout the world. The truth of the matter is, we are all we got! So, coming together in solidarity and building healthy relationships amongst each other will finally lead towards the cease of trauma, structural, and interpersonal violence that happen on the daily"